WHAT IS CHITOSAN?

  • Chitosan is a cationic polysaccharide of natural origin obtained by alkaline deacetylation of chitin.
  • The chitin used in the production of Reaxon® tubes is of natural origin.

PROPERTIES OF CHITOSAN

  • Bioactive – supports nerve regeneration equivalent to the autograft 4
  • Antiadhesive – inhibits scar tissue and neurona formation 5
  • Biocompatible – does not induce any immune response 6
  • Antibacterial – limits infection risks 7

REAXON® NERVE REGROWTH AND PROTECTION TUBE ARE : 

  • Made of polysaccharides
  • Resorbable 1
  • Transparent
  • Easy to suture (hydrogel)

/ REAXON® DIRECT – ULTRA FLEXIBLE PROTECTION TUBE 

Intended for use in repair of peripheral nerve discontinuities in patients with completely separated nerves that are treated by end-to-end coaptation.  

Higly flexible / Thin wall

The diameter indicated is in a dry state. Once Reaxon® Direct has been soaked, its diameter increases up to 0,5 mm.

/ REAXON® NERVE GUIDE – NERVE REGROWTH TUBE 

Intented for use in repair of peripheral nerve discontinuities in patients with completely separated nerves up to a nerve defect length of 26 mm.

Flexible / does not collapse 2 / Stable > 18 months 3

The diameter indicated is in a dry state. Once Reaxon® Direct has been soaked, its diameter increases up to 0,5 mm.

1 Internal testingat Medovent : Reports RDV-001 and RDV-002
2 Internal testing at Medovent : Reports NG0064 and NG0090
3 Internal testing at Medovent : Reports NG0086
4 Haastert-Talini et al. Chitosan tubes of varying degrees of acetylation for bridging peripheral nerve defects. Biomaterials 2013; 34: 9886-9904
5 Marcol et al. Reduction of post-traumatic neuroma and epineural scar formation in rat sciatic nerve by application of microcrystallic chitosan. Microsurgery 2011; 31: 642-649
6 The biocompatibility of Reaxon® Nerve Guide has been proven in accordance with the ISO 10993 standards
7 Rabea et al. Chitosan as antimicrobial agent: application and mode of action. Biomacromolecules 2003; 4: 1457-1465

Note : Bench testing is not necessarily indicative of clinical performance